A pet snake in the loft, a ghost story, a girls' gang bullying the boys and a conscientious objector from World War Two. How do they all link up? Read the book and find out if I can write a story, or if I should stick to poetry!


Reviews:

Python doesn’t ring with the same sounds as Moses’s poem, The Snake Hotel, for example (which you can listen to here), but it definitely strikes a chord of fear in the reader, and is written in clear, precise prose.

Daniel lives with his zookeeper father, and also with his father’s pet snake, a python residing in the attic. Unfortunately, Daniel is terrified of the snake and his imagination conjures up the horrors of the snake’s escape from its cage. But added to Daniel’s nightmares is his waking life, in which he is bullied by a girl gang who roam the streets on his way to and from school. When he starts to study the Second World War at school, as well as taking refuge from the girl gang in his grandfather’s house, the stories of the past start to merge with Daniel’s current fears, and before long snakes, girls and ghosts of the past all converge.

Moses’ prose is certainly more straightforward than some of his poetry, but it still conveys plenty of emotion. A whizz with language, the author uses his prose form to whip the plot at pace, and with economy, so that action is always forefront, all the time managing to eke out enormous authenticity in the characters. From Daniel and his friend Errol and their believable camaraderie, to the relationship between Daniel and his grandfather – the weariness from boys who despair of that generation’s ‘going on about the war’ and so rarely visit, but also seek wisdom and enlightenment and eventually realise that their grandparents are real people with exciting stories to impart. The book is set in the 1980s with all the freedom afforded to children that this entails – ghost-hunting on their own, and the lack of health and safety implied in keeping snakes in attics, and yet the novel also touches on parental break up and a child returning to an empty house from school – something that feels completely up to date.


An entertaining mix of history, the supernatural, contemporary families, and snakes. You can buy your own copy here.

(MinervaReads)

It demonstrates a poet's economic and effective use of language to swiftly engage the reader in the story of a boy with estranged parents, living quite literally under the burden, both of a terror of his father's pet python in the attic and the more usual, but none the less authentic and truly horrible, school bullies he encounters every day.

The fact that the latter are girls will certainly hit a chord and recognition from teachers and victims alike. Add to this an intergenerational tale about bravery and treachery in World War 2, friendship and loyalty together with supernatural possibilities, and this all leavened with great humour and you will find a very rewarding class read with many useful curricular links to history, citizenship and PSHE but which more importantly tells a great story!

(School Zone/Reading Zone)

 

 

 

'Lost Magic: The Very Best of Brian Moses' is published in hardback on Sept 8th.

It contains over 100 of my personal favourite poems including 'Walking With My Iguana', 'The Ssssnake Hotel', 'Shopping Trolley', 'What Teachers Wear In Bed', 'Cakes in the Staffroom', 'Lost Magic', 'Billy's Coming Back' and 'A Feather From an Angel'.

It also contains 20 new poems plus ' Return to the Ssssnake Hotel'. The cover is by the wonderful Ed Boxall.

BUY THE BOOK @ Amazon on Kindle, Hardcover & Paperback!



 

 

 

DREAMER: Saving Our Wild World.

I dreamt I was a whale and no hunters chased after me...
I dreamt I was a rainforest and no one felled a single tree...


One child dreams of a world where wild creatures are safe and free to roam, where water is clean and air is pure.

This inspirational picture book is a call to all of us to stand up for the future of our planet and help to save our WILD WORLD.

Written by a top performance poet in lyrical, atmospheric language that will capture children’s imaginations A book to inspire young children to think about big issues such as conservation, poverty and fairness in our worldIncludes a selection fo resources to fruther encourage discussion and activities, at home and at school Beautifully illustrated with Bee Willey’s unique style of acrylics and collage.

 

Read an interview with Bee Willey, SCBWI's featured illustrator May 2016
http://www.wordsandpics.org/2016/05/featured-illustrator-bee-willey.html

 

 

KEEPING CLEAR OF PARADISE STREET

(A Seaside Childhood in the 1950s)

Brian’s childhood autobiography for children. Read how different life was when Brian was a child. Pre-publication copies now available from

www.candyjarbooks.co.uk.

 

Full launch in March 2016.

“Paradise Street in our town was a street you didn’t go down. All the boys I was warned not to play with lived on Paradise Street. All the boys who swore, who wore scars like fashion accessories, who didn’t need a reason to beat you up or knock you down, they all lived on Paradise Street. I ask you, who in their right mind would call somewhere Paradise Street?”


 


Brian's poem 'Walking With My Iguana' was the poem that was
listened to the most on the Poetry Archive during 2015.
He beat off competition from... Ted Hughes, Philip Larkin and
T.S.Eliot to win by a huge margin.
Listen to "Walking with my iguana" HERE


Brians book 'The Monster Sale' (Frances Lincoln)


Has won the Poetry category of the 2014 Sheffield Children's Book Awards.
This is an award that is judged by children so.... a big THANK YOU to everyone who voted for me.


Brian Moses performs "Billy is Coming Back"



 

Did you know?

Brian Moses now lives in the Sussex village of Burwash where the famous writer Rudyard Kipling once lived?

Did you know?

Brian kept chickens for 9 years.
His favourite one was called, Boadicea Warrior Chicken
.


Did you know?

Brian's poem 'Walking with my Iguana' is one of the most often performed poems in schools?